Thirteen graduate from the Oklahoma School for the Deaf

OSD class 2013

SULPHUR – Thirteen students from the Oklahoma School for the Deaf received diplomas May 21 in a commencement ceremony in the OSD gym, at 1100 East Oklahoma Street in Sulphur.

The OSD 2014 graduating class included Amber Marie Cooper of Lane, Rodolfo Apolinar Jr. of Ardmore, Nathan Christopher Coon of Paoli, Erika Nicole Gillihan of Sulphur, Ty Blake Jenkins of Sulphur, Alex Christopher McCool of Choctaw, Nico Angelo McCormick of Moore, Melissa Susie Pace of Sulphur, Amy Lenn Pena of Altus, Morgan Renee Ponder of Tulsa, Haylee Tess Reynolds of Swink, Trynecka Olivia Sheffey of Pauls Valley and Breanna Lynn Winfree of Guthrie.

“This has been a great group of students. I look forward to seeing what this group of graduates accomplish," KaAnn Varner, OSD superintendent.

Twelve graduate from Oklahoma School for the Blind

OSB seniors pose for graduation photo

MUSKOGEE — Twelve seniors at the Oklahoma School for the Blind received their diplomas Thursday during a commencement ceremony in the OSB auditorium, at 3300 Gibson Street, in Muskogee.

The OSB 2014 graduating class includes Justus Cheyenne Atwood of Eufaula, Moddasy Renee Bateman of Pryor, Taylor Grace Carter of Lawton, Riley Dalton Fly of Edmond, Bryce Anthony Kesterson of Sapulpa, Briar Scott Lostlen of Enid, Montana Rain Nichole Lowrey of Tahlequah, Mykala Sierra Moore of Glenpool, Brandon Walking Bear Northcross of Chandler, Sara Virginia Rawlings of Muskogee, Miranda Louise Young of Muskogee and Aubry Alyn Weatherly of Lawton.

“I would like to wish our graduates the best future possible as this is a very special achievement in everyone’s life. I hope each of our seniors will spend a moment reflecting on how much they have learned in life and where their dreams for the future will take them,” James Adams, OSB superintendent, said.

iPad loan from Library for the Blind lightens educational load for visually impaired Southmoore student

three women with an iPad

OKLAHOMA CITY – Any high school student would rather use an iPad in class instead of a regular, old textbook. For Southmoore junior Katie Loman, who has a visual disability, a 1.45 pound iPad not only customizes print size, it liberates her from juggling more than 60 pounds of text books.

Students with visual impairments generally use three large print books for each standard print book. Braille students use seven to ten volumes.

Braille Challenge® to test students’ skills Feb. 28 at Oklahoma School for the Blind in Muskogee

A Braille Challenge contestant smiles

MUSKOGEE, Okla. – Twenty-seven students who are blind or visually impaired are registered to compete February 28 in the Oklahoma Regional Braille Challenge® sponsored by the Oklahoma School for the Blind in Muskogee.

Last year, OSB eighth-grade student Richelle Zampella advanced from this regional competition to place second in the sophomore division at the national Braille Challenge® in Los Angeles.

She is the first person from Oklahoma to place at the national level in this competition.

Pages